20th Century Woodstock Artists — Gallery Talk with Ted Boyer

Posted on Oct 15, 2013

October 20, 2013

2 pm

Clarence Bolton

Clarence Bolton Red Barn

Jehudith Sobel  Sunflowers

Jehudith Sobel Sunflowers

Referring to paintings from the collection of Ted Boyer and Jane Rohlf and Bob and Alison Boyer Eriksen on display at the Trenton City Museum, Ted Boyer will share his knowledge of the 20th century artists of Woodstock, NY in a gallery talk on Sunday, October 20 at 2 pm. The Boyer family has collected art created by Woodstock artists from the earliest days of the Byrdcliffe artists colony up to the seventh decade of the Twentieth Century.

In the early 20th Century, artists, many of whom were associated with the Art Students League of New York City, came together in Woodstock to share their collective creativity and live near the town of Woodstock in the Catskill Mountains.

One of the oldest organizations of its kind, the Woodstock Artists Association was founded in the early 1900’s by painters John Carlson, Frank Swift Chase, Andrew Dasburg, Carl Eric Lindin and Henry Lee McFee.  Paintings by Carlson and Chase are included in the exhibit. Some came as early as 1903 to live at Ralph Whitehead’s Byrdcliffe, an early artists’ colony, some studied at the Art Students League summer programs, while others came to live at the Maverick, a progressive community founded by writer Hervey White. During the Great Depression in the 1930’s, many Woodstock artists documented the social conditions of the era in their paintings and photographs through the WPA programs.

Early members of the association included George Bellows, Lucile Blanch, Konrad Cramer, Robert Henri, Rockwell Kent, Leon Kroll, Eugene Speicher, Zulma Steele and Eva Watson-Schutze.  Other members included Andrew Dasburg, Charles Rosen, Grant Arnold, John Carroll, Karl Fortess, Phil Fitzpatrick, Ethel Magafan, Bruce Currie, Cecile Forman and Yasuo Kuniyoshi.

 

Ted Boyer stands in front of paintings from his collection of Woodstock art.

Ted Boyer stands in front of paintings from his collection of Woodstock art.